The DECIPHER Project: from the interoperability to the procurement of innovation

8 Jun

Jean Patrick Mathieu

In 2013 when Agència de Qualitat i Avaluació Sanitàries (AQuAS) relaunched the project DECIPHER (@DECIPHERpcpEU), we were pioneering in the field of Procurement of Innovation and little did we know on the journey ahead. The project proved to be a big challenge for the AQuAS, the Catalan Department of Health and the all consortium involved.

The European Commission Officers and the projects evaluators would also be faced with a new type of project and with the projects consortium and stakeholders, we all learned a lot in this exciting adventure.

The journey would end in March 2017 with the Barcelona final event, but the aftermath of the projects will definitely be felt in the years to come.

Rossana Alessandrello at the DECIPHER – FINAL EVENT (Barcelona 2017)

DECIPHER was a project funded by the European Commission under the 7th  Framework Programme (FP7) under a call for project in 2011 whose topic was “Patient Guidance Services (PGS), safety and healthcare record information reuse”.

The objective of the project was to enable secure cross-border mobile access to existing patient healthcare portals which are individually supported by public bodies.

DECIPHER would deploy Pre-commercial Procurement (PCP) to create step-change innovations in mobile patient ICTs. Using electronic patient records as the key enabling technology, this joint PCP would create technology-led service transformation in cross-border mobile healthcare, delivering qualitative and significant benefits to patients and healthcare organisations.

The Consortium consisted of ESTAR Centro (Tuscany), TicSalut (Catalonia) and CMFT (Manchester).  Suppliers will be challenged to build on outputs from epSOS, CALLIOPE, and LOD2, and advances in mobile technology. Moreover, experts from Greece, France, Finland, UK, Sweden and Ireland will provide support.

DECIPHER will generate a portfolio of interoperable applications, deployed on a pan-European platform. This resource will improve existing healthcare services by supporting mobility of patients and healthcare providers.

As a use-case scenario, the solutions were to focus on patients with a chronic health condition and Diabetes type II was selected.

From anywhere in the European Union, a patient will be able to use a secure mobile device safely to gain 24/7 access to their prescription data, emergency data, examination results and other health information.

By the end of the project, 6 prototypes solutions were funded of which 3 finalists received full funding to develop a full final version. Although the respective national Personal Health Records (PHRs) systems of the three procuring authorities are not able to implement those solutions in their current state, the achievements are important for DECIPHER:

  1. Invaluable experiences were gathered by all stakeholders involved in the project
  2. SMEs from all over Europe came under the radar of potential clients, the public procuring authorities in the consortium and those who were interested on the project
  3. AQuAS acquired an expertise in procurement of innovation that is now well-renowned in Europe and beyond.
  4. The lessons learned will be applied in the new PCP project coordinated by AQuAs, Antisuperbugs.

DECIPHER project was initially designed to address the interoperability issue in the healthcare sector. But, this project has been fundamental in the development of a model of procurement of innovation useful for the set-up of this kind of project. With this objective in Catalonia, we consider DECIPHER as a case use where AQuAS lead the path with a set of toolkit, methodology and expertise.

Post written by Jean Patrick Mathieu.

Email this to someoneShare on FacebookShare on Google+Tweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedIn

An indicator for a more fairly funded primary care

7 Apr

Cristina Colls

The Catalan government has recently expressed its willingness to increase the importance ascribed to the socio-economic level of regions when calculating the budget for each primary care team.

This fact invites us to ask ourselves a question: why is it important to bear in mind the economic inequality in the funding of primary care teams?

The influence of socio-economic inequalities on the health of the population is a fact that has been widely studied since the 60s of last century and of which there is evidence both in the international and national context.

We know that people with a lower socio-economic status have more probability of dying before the age of 65 and that they show more physical and mental health problems during their lives. It is logical, therefore, to conclude that they need to make a more intensive use of health resources.

We also know that social inequality is a recipe for an unbalanced distribution of the population in a territory leading to an accumulation of the most serious social problems in specific municipalities or neighbourhoods that have a greater need for social and healthcare than other regions.

It is in this context that more needs to be done where there is greater necessity if equity in the allocation of resources is to be guaranteed. But where should more resources be provided?

The professionals of primary care teams are those closest to the citizen and therefore, have a comprehensive view of the health needs of the population in their territory.

In addition, the primary environment is the reference in prevention activities, in controlling chronic diseases and from which a large part of community activity is coordinated. For all these reasons, the provision for primary care teams must bear in mind the socio-economic conditions of the population they serve.

How can we find out what the socio-economic situation is of territories in which a primary care primary care team works? Many variables exist which give us indirect information (income, occupation, education, housing conditions, among others) but if we are looking for only one classification we need a unique index that synthesises all these aspects; it is what we call a deprivation index.

Deprivation indexes have been widely used as a tool in social policies because they allow an objective prioritisation to be established in small regions, ranging from a low to high socio-economic status. The concept of “deprivation” refers to unmet needs as a result of a lack of resources, not exclusively economic.

All indexes of deprivation are built by adding up the results of different socio-economic status indicators. The weight given to each indicator could be theoretical, that is, based on what a particular indicator is thought to contribute to the phenomenon of deprivation; or otherwise, the result of a multivariate statistical model.

To be able to classify the basic areas of health (reference territories of a primary care team) according to their socio-economic level, AQuAS has built an index called a composite socio-economic status indicator which synthesises seven indicators: population exempt from drug co-payment, population with incomes lower than 18,000€, population with incomes higher than 100,000€, population with manual jobs, population with insufficient educational attainment, premature deaths or potentially avoidable hospitalisations.

The statistical methodology used for calculating this indicator has been that of principal component analysis. The application of this methodology has allowed us to obtain a socio-economic status map of Catalonia.

The application of the composite socio-economic status indicator has been done within the framework of the redefinition of the model of allocation of resources for primary care and has enabled the identification of those primary care teams which will increase their budgets in coming years.

This new model of allocating resources for primary care is an experience in applying scientific evidence to political action.

Post written by Cristina Colls.

Email this to someoneShare on FacebookShare on Google+Tweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedIn

The main challenge in mHealth is understanding each other

3 Mar
Toni Dedéu - DECIPHER final event 2017

Toni Dedéu

In recent years, the debate about what we should do with health apps has centred around accreditation, certification or assessment. At the same time, multiple lists of health apps recommended by a range of known and recognised initiatives have been drawn up.

An example of this would be the iSYScore2017 ranking of the Fundació iSYS which was presented in the context of the CAMFiC a few weeks ago.

rànquing apps salut

In this context, and with the Mobile World Congress 2017 in Barcelona in full swing, we can ask ourselves what role a Health Technology Assessment (HTA) agency has when considering mHealth.

There is a reality which we cannot evade. Any health intervention needs to be based on evidence, on knowledge of the highest quality at hand, and must be evaluated.

This cannot be done by turning our backs on the real world or innovation. A health app is a tool to carry out a health intervention and so health apps need to be seen as just another intervention, but of course, with some characteristics of their own which will mean there is an extra demand placed on one and all.

Technologists, HTA experts, professionals and citizens have the opportunity to understand each other if we want to be facilitators of recommending safe apps in health. We are not talking about initiatives that can be developed from one sector only and it is not only about apps.

Now more than ever, we need to be flexible and work from a multidisciplinary position. We already talk about co-creation and co-design; quite simply, of co-produced mHealth initiatives based on the expertise of multiple agents including, obviously, citizens.

AQuAS is participating in the assessment of several mHealth projects financed by the European Commission. The PEGASO project stands out, centred on promoting healthy lifestyles among adolescents, and DECIPHER, as an integral solution to facilitate the geographical mobility of patients with chronic diseases such as diabetes type 2 and m-resist, centred on schizophrenia and patients resistant to treatment.

We are faced with the challenge of integrating totally different fields such as the language of technologists and developers; the speed of innovation and the culture of assessment. In addition, this needs to be done without losing sight of the key role of scientific societies and the different points of view of health professionals and end users.

We know there is a lot of work to be done. Technologists and experts in health technology assessment, respectively, have the opportunity to learn a lot from each other. It is about sharing knowledge and expertise to facilitate, ultimately, health tools for citizens and professionals, which have been assessed, are based on evidence, are safe and reliable and have a strong collaborative component.

MWC17

Digital Health and Wellness Summit – MWC17

 

Post written by Toni Dedéu (@Toni_Dedéu) and Elisa Puigdomènech.

Email this to someoneShare on FacebookShare on Google+Tweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedIn

mHealth & user experience: the user decides

23 Feb
Marta Millaret - Elisa Puigdomènech - MWC2017

Marta Millaret and Elisa Puigdomènech

The Economist recently published an article in which they reported that the number of mobile health applications, or apps, was in the region of 165.000, a very high figure that poses many questions.

A large part of these apps are related to well-being and promoting healthy lifestyles, but what makes us choose one over another?

The first thing that comes to mind is that mobile health apps, being a health technology, could and should be assessed based on their impact on health and this is where we are faced with our first problem.

While there is a gold standard when assessing this impact in the area of medication and static interventions in randomized clinical trials, how is this impact assessed in a highly dynamic world? In a world that can include a range of components that users can use depending on their needs? Where pressure is added due to the fact that advances in technology are being made in leaps and bounds and we cannot wait for years before getting results? It is not that simple.

If we venture into the area of mHealth, the first thing we find is great diversity. The design, requirements and assessment of an app developed to help manage diabetes in older people is very different to an app aimed at providing a dose for some medication where improving its adherence is sought, or an app to promote not drinking alcohol among young people before sitting in the driver’s seat, or an app to manage depression and anxiety.

What are we trying to say with all this? Easy and complex at the same time: the intervention that one wants to do via a health app and the target users will determine their use and their adherence.

And we are only just beginning. Apart from aspects related to health and the suitability of content or other more technological factors such as interoperability and security -by no means simple-, other factors come onto the scene such as acceptability, usability and satisfaction, factors related to User Experience (UX).

User Experience in mHealth is essential given that the main aim of it all is to make the tools which are being developed viable, accepted and used by the population who they are meant for, and also that the aim for which they were designed be respected.

After all, the end user who has the last word in deciding whether a health app is used or not, and this is why their participation in all phases of developing these mHealth tools is crucial.

Pursuing these aims of feasibility, acceptability and usability can make us reflect on, for example, the difficulty some old-age people may have when learning to use a smartphone for the first time. However, these obstacles related to the generational factor also exist among young people with new languages.

We suggest let yourself surprised by this video that shows how some adolescents react and interact when using Windows 95 for the first time.

The Mobile World Congress 2017 will be taking place in Barcelona next week. Monday will be one of the days circled into the diary of many professionals interested in subjects on mobiles and health with the Digital Health & Welness Summit 2017 programme.

DWHW 2017

But not everything will be happening at the Mobile. Another important mHealth event will take place on March 1st at the Palau Robert in Barcelona with the DECIPHER project final event.

logo decipherTo be continued

Post written by Elisa Puigdomènech and Marta Millaret (@martamillaret).

 

Email this to someoneShare on FacebookShare on Google+Tweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedIn

Analysis of research data in health: opportunities within reach

9 Feb
Xavier Serra-Picamal

Xavier Serra-Picamal

The generation and storage of data is omnipresent nowadays. The costs have fallen drastically and the health sector is not alien to this. To illustrate this, it is worth having a look at the following graph created by the National Institutes of Health about the human genome, which shows the evolution of the cost of sequencing a genome:Cost per genome

As can be seen, since 2007, the cost of sequencing a genome has fallen dramatically. Having one’s own genome sequenced is now possible and in the future it may become commonplace. Bearing in mind that a copy of the human genome is made up of aproximately 3 million base pairs (3 million adeninines, thymines, citosines or guanines arranged sequentially in 23 chromosomes ) it is easy to infer that, also within this field, the quantity of data generated in the coming years will be massive.

This tendency is repeated in other areas of health care: among other, clinical history data in electronic format, medical imaging, primary care data or that of drug consumption are obtained and stored in registries, in general, structured and interlinked. The potential of this data for carrying out research in order to provide better health care is notable, in the way of faster and more accurate diagnoses, improved therapeutic approaches and a better management of the system.

To analyse the challenges and opportunities at a European level, a work session organised by the Directorate-General for Research and Innovation of the European Commission was held in Luxembourg with representatives from AQuAS. The points discussed have been gathered in the article Making sense of big data in health research: Towards an EU action plan, published in the Genome Medicine magazine and of open access. As explained in the article, using this information to provide better healthcare is a challenge but a great opportunity at the same time.

Making sense of big data in health research

Nevertheless, a big effort is required to transform this data into knowledge and specific actions. However much the costs of generating and storing data may drop, the management of information, its interpretation, and the generation of knowledge needs considerable investment and resources. This means having adequate information systems as well as the economic and human resources so that the data can be treated efficiently and the protection of individual rights guaranteed. In addition, the participation, commitment and effective communication of all the agents of the system is needed (including the scientific community, patients, citizens, the administration, and so on) to guarantee that this data is used efficiently, responsibly and that it promotes research which is efficient and of quality.

Catalonia, because of the size of its population, the fact that it has an integrated health system and the work done over many years, is well positioned to be able promote the reuse of health data for research. At an international level, some comparable projects exist and new projects exist with the goal of integrating and consolidating data from different sources, with some very ambitious and attractive programmes. The  PADRIS Programme, presented last 12 January, aims to centralise and make the data generated in health available to researchers in research centres in Catalonia and universities so as to provide better healthcare with a maximum guarantee in security and privacy. The work to be done is considerable. The resources needed too. The opportunities to provide better research and better healthcare are within reach.

Post written by Xavier Serra-Picamal, researcher at the Karolinska Institutet (Sweden).

* TERMCAT (the centre for terminology in the Catalan language) has recently dealt with the question of how to say data scientist in Catalan. The subject is very much a current issue!

Email this to someoneShare on FacebookShare on Google+Tweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedIn

Adjusted morbidity groups: a new population morbidity classifier

2 Feb
Foto Emili Vela

Emili Vela

At present, chronic pathologies have become a challenge for health systems in developed countries. The majority of sick people that use health services have multiple morbidity and this increases with age. The presence of multiple morbidity is associated with a greater use of resources for care (both health and social) and a lower quality of life.

In this context, it is necessary to measure multiple morbidity to be able to determine its impact. There are two large sets of measurements of multiple morbidity: on the one hand, a simple count of the diseases (usually chronic) of each person and, on the other, indexes which indicate the burden of an individual’s diseases based on the ranking of pathologies giving each one a differential weighting drawn from clinical criteria provided by groups of experts and/or statistical analysis based on mortality or the utilisation of health services.

The Adjusted Morbidity Groups (AMG) are encompassed in this last group, the only one of these tools developed in Europe on the basis of a public health system, universal in nature and eminently free.

Los grupos de morbilidad ajustados

The characteristics and functioning of the AMG can be found in this article. In a nutshell, we can say that the AMG have been validated statistically, by analysing their explanatory and predictive capacity. In this validation, the AMG have shown better results than other tools in the majority of indicators studied, including those relative to social and health care.

Concordancia y utilidad sistema estratificación

They have also been validated clinically by primary care doctors, both in Catalonia and in the Community of Madrid. The main results of these validations are that the AMG show a good classification of the patient in terms of risk, that this good classification increases with the complexity of the patient, the preference of clinicians for this tool with respect to other tools to classify morbidity and finally, that it is a useful tool for assigning a level of intervention in accordance with the needs of patients.

From 2012, the AMG were developed in the framework of an agreement of collaboration between CatSalut and Catalan Health Institute. Subsequently, they have been implemented at a national level in 13 autonomous communities thanks to an agreement reached between CatSalut and the Ministry of Health, Social and Equality Services. As a result of the implementations done during 2015, 38 million people of the Spanish population have been classified. The final goal of this agreement is to jointly develop a tool to stratify the population and which could be applicable to the entire National Health System by means of adapting the AMG.

Proposals enhanced health risk

Similarly, the AMG are being used in several European projects concerning the stratification and integration of health and social care.

In summary, we can assert that the AMG are a new classifier of morbidity which shows comparable results -at the very least- to those provided by other classifiers on the market. On the other hand, having been developed using the information from our health system (universal and eminently free), it can not only be adapted to new requirements or strategies of our organisations, but also to other health systems as well as to specific areas or populations. Evidence of this last point is that at the moment, together with the Master Plan of Mental Health and Addictions of the Health Department, a specific classifier is being developed for patients with mental health and addiction problems.

Post written by David Monterde (Oficina d’Estadística. Sistemes d’Informació. Institut Català de la Salut), Emili Vela (Àrea d’Atenció Sanitària. Servei Català de la Salut) and Montse Clèries (Àrea d’Atenció Sanitària. Servei Català de la Salut).

Email this to someoneShare on FacebookShare on Google+Tweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedIn

Health literacy, a need

26 Jan
Mercè Piqueras 2016

Mercè Piqueras

Traditionally, knowledge in medicine was considered an exclusive domain of medical professionals. Patients were passive subjects that listened to a diagnosis while hardly understanding it and followed, or not, the instructions they were given by the doctor. Nowadays, an attempt is made to provide patients with enough basic medical knowledge to allow them to interact with the doctor, take decisions about their health and avoid making mistakes that could have serious repercussions.

One of the subjects discussed at the 2016 European Health Forum Gastein (this Forum is an annual gathering organised by the European Commission in Bad Hofgastein, Austria, to discuss subjects related to health which affect European countries) was health literacy or, otherwise known as, the ability to access the relevant information for one’s own health or that of society and to be able to understand and assess it. It refers to the understanding of what the doctor tells the patient and the information contained in the patient information leaflets that accompany drugs. It also refers to the ability of identifying whether the information on health in the media is reliable, understanding the information on food labels and also participating in activities which improve health and well-being.

The first European Health Literacy Survey (HLS-EU) was carried out in the summer of 2011. Eight states from the EU took part and the questionnaire centred around three aspects (health care, disease prevention and health promotion) and in four of the phases in processing and informing (access, understanding, assessment and application).

 

Health Literacy

While in the Netherlands 70% of the population have sufficient or excellent knowledge, in Spain, this percentage is 41,7% and it is the area with the highest percentage of problematic situations (50,08%).

Similar studies done in the United States indicate that a lack of health literacy carries risks, puts the breaks on the self-management of an illness and increases medical visits and hospital admissions and therefore, the expenditure on health.

Health literacy is not parallel to the degree of literacy in general. For example, the consumption of homeopathic products, the resistance to vaccination, or the belief that transgenic products are harmful for one’s health are widespread attitudes in some well-educated sectors with a high cultural baggage but which have a mistaken or biased knowledge of certain subjects on health. Unfortunately, these people believe they are well informed and are probably the population group where it will be most difficult to eradicate this type of illiteracy.

Post written by Mercè Piqueras (@lectoracorrent), biologist, science writer, science editor and translator, president of the Catalan Association for Science Communication in the period 2006-2011.

Email this to someoneShare on FacebookShare on Google+Tweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedIn

What are the SISCAT atlas of variations all about?

19 Jan
atles-variacions-siscat

Laura Muñoz (Atlas of variations SISCAT), Laia Domingo (RaCat), Olga Martínez (RaCat)

At present, if you live in the region of Terres de l’Ebre and need to be operated on to have a knee replacement, it is quite probable that the type of technique used is one which preserves the posterior cruciate ligament. On the other hand, if you go and live in Girona, the chances of having the same kind of knee replacement will be a lot less, but in contrast, the type of technique chosen will be that of stabilising the posterior.

 

If you live in Girona and have respiratory difficulties susceptible for home-based CPAP treatment (continuous positive airway pressure), you will more likely be prescribed this therapy than if you live in Lleida or the Terres de l’Ebre. If you live in Lleida, in contrast, there is more probability of you being prescribed oxygen therapy at home than if you live in the Terres de l’Ebre region and suffer from some kind of respiratory disease that could benefit from this treatment. And if you live in the coastal neighbourhoods of Barcelona you will more likely be prescribed mechanical ventilation at home than if you live in a neighbourhood situated further inland for those respiratory ventilation disorders that might need this technique.

Why does this happen? There is no evidence to suggest which type of intervention is most suitable and it is simply the fact that the health professionals of one region are more inclined than those of another to choose one technique over another. This variability reveals the existence of schools linked to certain hospital centres that condition the choice of the type of intervention or technique used.

This is the type of information that the Atlas of variations in clinical practice of the Catalan Healthcare System (SISCAT) make available to health professionals and the entire population, and which has been led and developed by AQuAS since 2011.

The aim of these atlases is to identify, describe and reduce the variability that can lead to increased well-being, quality and an improvement in the use of available resources. Up to the present, 7 atlases have been developed in which the variations in hip and knee arthroplasty operations have been analysed, as well as the variability in home-based respiratory therapies (oxygen therapy, mechanical ventilation and continuous positive airway pressure), the variation in intravenous thrombolysis in patients with ischemic stroke and the variability and in renal replacement therapy in patients with chronic kidney failure (haemodialysis, peritoneal dialysis and kidney transplant).

One of the sources of data for this study, in fact, the most widely used, is the basic minimum group of data obtained at the time of a hospital discharge (CMBD-AH, the Catalan acronym) where the results are presented as activity rates, reasons for standardised uses and variability statistics. The methodology that lies behind this initiative can be seen here. The basic strategy of all the analyses is to compare the rates of use (numerator: for example, hospital admittances) of the inhabitants in a region (denominator: for example, basic area of health), regardless of the centre where patients have been treated or admitted. In addition, both the rates and the reasons for use are reflected in maps to better visualise the data which is another interesting point nowadays.

Apart from all this, it is important to stress that all the atlases include actions and recommendations for planners (Health Department), insurer (CatSalut), providers and professionals, and which have been developed by a unique team of experts with whom the results of the atlases are discussed.

This year, we have decided to take another step forward and convert the publications we have had till now in a static format (PDF), into dynamic publications that facilitate greater interaction with the data and, therefore, a more global view of the clinical practice analysed.

This is an example of the visualisation of the interactive hip and knee arthroplasty atlas which feeds off the data in the Catalan Arthroplasty Registry (RaCat):

atles-digital-siscat-berga

Next year, you will be able to know whether there are variations in the Catalan territory regarding hospitalisations for back surgery, in the repair of abdominal aortic aneurysms and in gastrointestinal cancer surgery (esophagus, pancreatic, liver, stomach and rectal cancer).

We cannot end this post without thanking all the speakers that made the presentations seminar of the Atlas of variations in clinical practice of SISCAT possible last 21 November, and especially to Enrique Bernal-Delgado, the key professional in the analysis initiative and in mapping the variations of clinical practice in the Spanish National Health System.

As far as AQuAS is concerned, it is one of our work lines which was begun some time ago now which has recently generated publications such as this article on respiratory diseases and this article on kidney disease.

And I ask myself, …. now that we have the tools to identify and describe the variability in clinical practices which are carried out in Catalonia, why don’t we try and explain them? The atlases of variations in clinical practice of SISCAT are a key tool to ask ourselves questions.

Post written by Laura Muñoz, statistician.

Email this to someoneShare on FacebookShare on Google+Tweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedIn

In memory of professor Joan Rodés

12 Jan
Joan MV Pons

Joan MV Pons

With his passing away, Dr Joan Rodés (1938-2017) will be remembered by many people in person, and in many fields, for those who had the good fortune to know him as a doctor, researcher, manager and assessor (of politicians), as his was a life full to the brim. No matter which professional activity he took part in, and with the responsibilities he took on throughout his life, he left his mark and the accolades expressed these days are a clear demonstration of this.

To AQuAS (originally AATM), Joan Rodés has been an exceptional figure and I say this without any rhetoric whatsoever. When the Agency was created in 1994, he presided its scientific board of assessors and at the end of 1999, when the institution became known as Catalan Agency for Health Tecnology Assessment and Research (CAHTA), in Catalan Agència d’Avaluació de Tecnologia i Recerca Mèdiques (AATRM), he presided its Administrative Board, a position that he held till 2010. It was in that period (2000-2006) that, due to my responsabilities within the Agency as Managing Director, I was able to get to know this great personality more closely, very much a big strong fellow (in Catalan, a homenot) was Joan, as Josep Pla would say. At that time, we saw each other often, and I had frequent exchanges with him, aside from the more or less termly meetings of the Administrative Board. I did this in that minute office of the haematology services and later in that of the General Manager at the Hospital Clinic.

No matter what the position he occupied, he was always watchful -very much so- of events at the Agency, being a great facilitator of its duties. It was like this, without a doubt, because with Joan Rodés there was no need to convince him of the importance of informing well about decisions taken in the health services, using the most updated and precise knowledge that was available, not only that regarding the benefits and risks to health of medical interventions, but also in terms of its economic, ethical and social impact. For him and I quote his words literally from the AATRM Newsletter, 10 years of the Agency, of November 2004:

“critical assessment and continued learning are basic tools that need to be maintained and improved, not only by the Agency, in its everyday activity, but also by all the multiple actors and stakeholders in the health system (professionals, managers, politicians and citizens) that wish to continue sustaining this element of such importance for our social well-being”

I said this because of his role of facilitator as highest representative of the Agency giving constant support to the activities it carried out, but also because of his extensive experience and network of relationships that contributed to giving strength to many initiatives that were then being undertaken, especially in the field of research and its assessment. I was able to discuss this with him on many occasions at a later date, and I never once perceived an interventionist or managerial attitude; quite the opposite, always with a laissez-faire approach where each one had to do their assigned task (the technicians and managing director of the Agency, the scientific board and the administrative board) while facilitating that of others.

It has always been a great pleasure for me -a privilege better said- to have maintained contact at dinners and get-togethers, even during the last period in which his respiratory illness worsened, but he would still go to IDIBAPS from time to time despite this. I cannot end without saying that during those times when we would talk about any and everything (medicine, science, politics, society, the past, present and future) we had a really good laugh. Then as now that you have left us, you are and will very much be in my thoughts.

Post written by Joan MV Pons

agencia-2004-ca

Joan Rodés presiding an Administrative Board of AATRM in 2004

Email this to someoneShare on FacebookShare on Google+Tweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedIn

Let’s begin the new year…

5 Jan

We begin the year by saying a big thank you.

Frederic Llordachs, Veva Barba, Gemma Bruna, Elena Torrente, Cari Almazan, Emili Vela, Montse Mias, Lluís Bohígas, Cristian Tebé Cordomí, Neus Solé Peñalver, Montse Moharra, Aline Noizet, Mercè Piqueras, Josep Maria Monguet, Gabi Barbaglia, Joan Escarrabill, Cristina Ribas, Carme Carrion, Verónica Vélez, Astrid Batlle, Andrea Aldemira, Sílvia Ricart, Esther Lasheras, Olga Valsells, Joaquín Gascón, Angela Coulter, Arantxa Catalán, Anna Càrol Pérez Segarra, Núria Prat, Roser Vallès, Dilmeza Osorio, Johanna Caro, Iris Lumillo, Oscar Garcia, Luis Rajmil, Andrea Molina, Diego Mena, Jose Expósito, Vicky Serra-Sutton, Dolors Rodríguez Arjona, Joan MV Pons, Esther Vizcaino Garcia, Mireia Espallargues, Laia Domingo, Noemí Robles, Sandra García-Armesto, Enrique Bernal-Delgado, Hortènsia Aguado, Anna García-Altés, Dolores Ruiz Muñoz, Santi Gómez, Laura Mónica Pérez, Marco Inzitari, Liliana Arroyo, Maite Solans, Toni Dedéu, Marta Millaret

2016 AQuAS blog contributors

 

In 2016, those who collaborated in the AQuAS blog were: Frederic Llordachs, Veva Barba, Gemma Bruna, Elena Torrente, Cari Almazan, Emili Vela, Montse Mias, Lluís Bohígas, Cristian Tebé Cordomí, Neus Solé Peñalver, Montse Moharra, Aline Noizet, Mercè Piqueras, Josep Maria Monguet, Gabi Barbaglia, Joan Escarrabill, Cristina Ribas, Carme Carrion, Verónica Vélez, Astrid Batlle, Andrea Aldemira, Sílvia Ricart, Esther Lasheras, Olga Valsells, Joaquín Gascón, Angela Coulter, Arantxa Catalán, Anna Càrol Pérez Segarra, Núria Prat, Roser Vallès, Dilmeza Osorio, Johanna Caro, Iris Lumillo, Oscar Garcia, Luis Rajmil, Andrea Molina, Diego Mena, Jose Expósito, Vicky Serra-Sutton, Dolors Rodríguez Arjona, Joan MV Pons, Esther Vizcaino Garcia, Mireia Espallargues, Laia Domingo, Noemí Robles, Sandra García-Armesto, Enrique Bernal-Delgado, Hortènsia Aguado, Anna García-Altés, Dolores Ruiz Muñoz, Santi Gómez, Laura Mónica Pérez, Marco Inzitari, Liliana Arroyo, Maite Solans, Toni Dedéu and Marta Millaret.

Thank you very much!

Blog AQuAS in Catalan Blog AQuAS in SpanishBlog AQuAS in English

Email this to someoneShare on FacebookShare on Google+Tweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedIn